KY Let's Move Active Schools Physical Activity Leader Training

Yesterday was Kentucky's first ever Let's Move Active Schools (LMAS) Physical Activity Leader (PAL) Training. Jamie Sparks, Coordinated School Health Director at the Kentucky Department of Education and I were the trainers. We had 57 PE teachers (K-12 represented) from all over the region excited to join in on the skill-building workshop, and, of course the fun!

Jamie Sparks and I were the trainers for the first #KYPAL training in Kentucky!

 

Let's Move Active Schools PAL training equips educators and other school health advocates to implement Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs (CSPAP). I don't love that we call it Programs, because in reality, CSPAP is really about implementing programs, policies and practices that create a culture of health in your school. The mantra is "60 a Day!" with the goal being students are physically active 60 minutes per day. That might sound like a lot, but it is really not.. Those 60 minutes of physical activity could include: time being physically active in physical education class, before and after school physical activity (laps programs, after school inter-murals, walk and bike to school efforts) and during school physical activity opportunities (within classroom environments, or breaks and recess). Plenty of opportunities to get students moving!

We know that there is research to demonstrate that incorporating physical activity (PA) in the classroom doesn't affect academic performance in any negative way. And, as Jamie Sparks alluded to in the training, we know that our brain on PA is like Miracle Grow on plants. In the classroom, it boosts attention & concentration. 

     
  
 
  
    
  
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     Physical  activity improves learning on three levels: “first, it optimizes your mind-set to improve alertness, attention, and motivation; second, it prepares and encourages nerve cells to bind to one another, which is the cellular basis for logging in new information; and third, it spurs the development of new nerve cells from stem cells in the hippocampus.”     John Ratey , SPARK

 

Physical  activity improves learning on three levels: “first, it optimizes your mind-set to improve alertness, attention, and motivation; second, it prepares and encourages nerve cells to bind to one another, which is the cellular basis for logging in new information; and third, it spurs the development of new nerve cells from stem cells in the hippocampus.”

John Ratey , SPARK

 

The training was full of movement, music, laughter and activities that engaged our participants. The participants participated in a carousel activity in which they were able to work in groups of 10 to brainstorm what they were currently doing around the areas of physical education, before and after school PA programs, PA during school, family and community engagement, and staff involvement at the elementary and/or secondary level. They also had a chance to discuss what could be done at their schools to strengthen these 5 areas of CSPAP.  We provided opportunities for them to learn the 7 Step Process for implementing CSPAP in their school (create a School Wellness Council, complete a needs assessment, create vision, goals and objectives, action plan, define outcomes, develop a plan of action, implement and measure success).

The teachers were engaged and enthusiastic for a summer professional development day! It was great to meet new teachers passionate about this work in my home state. Loved having the opportunity- thank you to all the partners that made it happen!

Carousel Activity

Carousel Activity

Let's Move Active Schools Physical Activity Leader Training

Welcoming the participants for the day.

Welcoming the participants for the day.

Yesterday, LMAS held it's first-ever LMAS PAL training at a national conference. Judy LoBianco and I facilitated the full-day event and had the opportunity to work with 40 fabulous new PALs from around the country and even the world! 

The goal of the training is to bring participants through a process in which they gain knowledge and skills to go home and implement a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program. It's actually not a program, but a philosophy or way of incorporating a minimum of 60 minutes of physical activity throughout a school day. The core of this work is quality physical education programs, taught by a certified physical education teacher who receives on-going professional development (ideal!). But, reality is that most students do not get 60 minutes of physical education a day. So, how do we incorporate physical activity throughout the day? Before and after-school programs, like walk and bike to school, open gym opportunities. We can promote physical activity during recess including incentives for walking or running laps for students. We can incorporate physical activity within the classroom- any classroom, any subject. For example, yesterday I encouraged participants to get up and make shapes and obtuse and acute angles with their bodies. Why not incorporate math and movement? With all those opportunities to include physical activity throughout the day, it should be no problem for every school in America to provide 60 minutes of physical activity (PA) throughout the day for their students. 

Judy LoBianco role modeling "Making the Case" pitch to "principal" Jamie Sparks.

Judy LoBianco role modeling "Making the Case" pitch to "principal" Jamie Sparks.

So, why do it? Well, obviously the obesity epidemic is on everyone's mind. But, there are a lot more benefits to implementing PA programs. Walking and biking to school means less vehicles on school grounds, which may mean less accidents and can result in better air quality that decreases asthma triggers and increases attendance (asthma is the leading cause of absenteeism related to chronic disease in many state). Walking and biking is also better for the environment and creates safer communities when youth are out and about. That is one example and realizing not every school is walk and bike accessible, there are 100s of other ways to incorporate PA throughout the day. The research on what PA does for the brain is there. It jumpstarts it again! It may lead to higher test scores and academic achievement. PA leads to increased motivation, alertness and attention. 

Jump on board! Learn about how you can get in involved in increasing PA for your students (and, I'd include staff in that as well!) by going here!

Gearing Up for School Health- Webinar!

I'm facilitating a webinar hosted by SPARK on Wednesday, March 19 at 3pm PST/6pm EST! More information on how to register to come, but see description below. Feel free to share with others.

“Riding the Path to a Comprehensive School Health Program”

You can’t ride a bicycle unless all the parts are working. In addition, the parts need to work cohesively for a smooth ride to your destination.  A successful comprehensive school health program (CSHP) must have multiple components working together for one common goal…. building healthier schools. Join us at the next SPARK webinar to learn about best practices and successful strategies for building your program, as well as develop action steps to support activities to make it happen. Students must be healthy in order to be educated, and they must be educated in order to stay healthy. Implementing a comprehensive school health program does not need to always be an uphill climb. Lead your school down the path by guiding the implementation of programs, policies, and activities to improve the health of children. Our guest speaker, Jessica Lawrence of Cairn Guidance will share her lessons learned and experiences in building a CSHP. Register now to start the journey towards a healthy school environment!

Attendees will:

  • Be presented with the relationship of health issues to education accountability measures (test scores, graduation rates, attendance);
  • Understand the CSHP model and how CSPAP fits into the model, and hear examples;
  • Be presented with information on best practices when building sustainable school health programs;
  • Be encouraged to set one next step goal around what you learned on the webinar.

10 Questions to Ask When Hiring District Superintendents and School Administrators

Do you believe in the link between health and learning? Do you support the notion that healthy kids learn better? As I dig into more and more research on what creates effective, sustainable school health programs, you know what keeps coming up? Administrative support. District-wide implementation. Superintendents taking the lead and saying, "My district will work on school health initiatives because I know there is a correlation between addressing staff and student wellness and test scores, attendance and graduation rates." So, how do we get more administrators on board? We don't want un-engaged superintendents that are passively supporting the work. We want leaders. And, one way to help ensure you are hiring a leader that will embrace this proven philosophy that healthy kids learn better is to hire well.

Here are 15 school health questions you can use when hiring leaders for your school or district. You could even use these when appointing school board members or state board of education members. 

  1. What comes to mind when I say, 'Coordinated school health?'
  2. Could you share any anecdotal experiences or research you have experienced or read between test scores, attendance and graduation rates and the health of students? 
  3. Do you have experience creating, supporting and/or implementing any policies at the school or district level around creating healthier and safer school environments?
  4. Explain how you personally value the link between health and learning. 
  5. How might addressing the health and wellbeing of your staff affect staff attendance, retention, health, costs and possibly even the academic success of your students?
  6. What does creating sustainable school health programs mean to you?
  7. How might your leadership embrace healthier school environments?
  8. What comes to mind when I say, 'Consistent healthy messages within a school environment?'
  9. What will you do to ensure our school/district is working to create healthy schools?
  10. What do you do to model a healthy lifestyle for your staff and students?

Healthy Louisville 2020; Creating a Healthier City

Kudos to my new city for the public health plan released last week! The roadmap serves as a call to action to guide Louisville towards a healthier city. The mission of the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness (LMPHW) is to promote health and wellness; prevent disease, illness, and injury; and protect the health and safety of Metro Louisville residents and visitors. The focus is prevention, evidence-based intervention and health in all policies. There are 13 goals within this roadmap. It's incredibly comprehensive. 

Of course being a school health consultant, who works nationally to create healthier schools, and living in Louisville, I need to make some suggestions as to how schools may be able to support this public health plan. I see that Donna Hargens, the Superintendent of Jefferson County Public Schools is on the Mayor's Healthy Hometown Movement Leadership Team. I love this! I'd like to suggest some recommendations from a K-12 school perspective that align to the 13 goals within the plan. I see a few mentions in the document regarding schools, but that doesn't mean we can't build off the recommendations and add more to support the plan at the K-12 level. Here we go...

Access to Healthcare: All Louisville Metro residents will have health insurance coverage and receive care in a patient-centered medial home. 

My Recommendations:

1. Utilize access to parents/guardians in schools to bring awareness and education of changes in eligibility criteria for Medicaid and ensure all Metro residents eligible for Medicaid are enrolled as part of the expansion under ACA. 

2. Promote and open School-Based Health Centers

 

Cancer Prevention and Screening: Decrease the incidence and death rates for all cancers in Louisville Metro. Goals include: decreasing lung, breast, cervical, prostate, colorectal cancers. Recommendations do include increasing awareness of HPV vaccine for both males and females through outreach to schools.

My Recommendation: Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the areas of healthy eating, physical activity, sexual health and tobacco. HBOs included should be for both knowledge and skill content standards.

 

Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening: Prevent, detect, and reduce risk factors that cause diabetes, coronary heart disease, and stroke among Louisville Metro residents. 

My Recommendations:
1. Work with Nutrition Services and JCPSs Coordinated School Health Wellness Committee to review expectations of this plan to JCPSs Wellness Policy. Possibly revise if there are opportunities to strengthen the policy.

2. Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the areas of healthy eating, physical activity, and tobacco. HBOs included should be for both knowledge and skill content standards. Some examples include:

HBO: Eat an abundance of fruits and vegetables every day.
Example of a K-2 Knowledge Expectation:
Explain the importance of choosing healthy foods and beverages. 
Example of a K-2 Skill Expectation:  Demonstrate effective refusal skills to avoid unhealthy food choices and promote healthy eating (Interpersonal Communication is the National Health Education Standard).

HBO: Regularly engage in physical activities that enhance cardio-respiratory endurance, flexibility, muscle endurance, and muscle strength. 
Example of a 9-12 Knowledge Expectation:
Evaluate the short-term and long-tern benefits of physical activity, including improving cardiovascular health, strength, endurance, and flexibility; healthy weight management; and reducing chronic diseases.
Example of a 9-12 Skill Expectation: Formulate an effective long-term personal health plan to achieve a personal goal to be physically active (Goal-Setting is the National Health Education Standard)

 

Healthy Neighborhoods and Healthy Homes: Reduce the prevalence of and death rate related to tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke in Louisville Metro. 

My Recommendation: Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the area of  tobacco. HBOs included should be for both knowledge and skill content standards. Some examples include:

HBO example: Avoid second-hand smoke and support a tobacco-free environment. 
Example of a 6-8 Knowledge Expectation: Summarize the effects of secondhand smoke. 
Example of a 6-8 Skill Expectation: Persuade others to be tobacco-free and avoid exposure to second-hand smoke (Advocacy is the National Health Education Standard).

 

Healthy Mothers and Healthy Babies: Improve the health and well-being of mothers and babies in Louisville Metro. One recommendation includes implementing evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs in Louisville. 

My Recommendation: Write and implement a K-12 sexual health policy that includes comprehensive, age appropriate sex education. See model policies through NASBE. Use HECAT to develop a sexual health promotion strand within JCPSs scope and sequence.

 

HIV Prevention and Screening: Reduce human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among Louisville Metro residents.

My Recommendation: Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the area of sexual health. HBOs included should be for both knowledge and skill content standards. Some examples include:

HBO example: Engage in behaviors that prevent or reduce sexually transmitted disease (STD), including HIV infection. 
Example of a 9-12 Knowledge Expectations: Justify why abstinence from sex and drugs are the safest, most effective risk avoidance methods of protection from HIV, other STDs, and pregnancy and summarize ways to prevent pregnancy and the sexual transmission of HIV and other common STDs. 
Example of a 9-12 Skill Expectation: Determine when professional sexual healthcare services may be required (Accessing Valid Information is the National Health Education Standard). 

 

Injury and Violence Prevention: Decrease the prevalence of violence and unintentional injuries in Louisville Metro. The plan includes identifying opportunities to increase educational attainment, close the achievement gap, and reduce the disproportionate number of school suspensions and alternative school placements by race. 

My Recommendation: Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the areas of violence and safety. HBOs included should be for both knowledge and skill content standards. Some examples include:

HBO Violence example: Manage interpersonal conflict in nonviolent ways. 
HBO Safey example: Support others to avoid risky behaviors and be safe. 
Example of a 3-5 Knowledge Expectation: Explain the role of bystanders in escalating, preventing or stopping bullying, fighting and violence. 
Example of a 3-5 Skill Expectation: Analyze how relevant influences of media and technology affect personal violence practices and behaviors (Analyzing Influences is the National Health Education Standard).

 

Mental and Behavioral Health: Improve the mental and emotional well-being of Louisville Metro residents. Plan includes a recommendation around improving mental and behavioral health data collection, including suicide attempts in grades K-12.

My Recommendations: 

1. Work with Kentucky Department of Education to implement CDCs Youth Risk Behavior Survey in all schools.

2. Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the areas of mental and emotional health and violence (where suicide is addressed in the HECAT). HBOs included should be for both knowledge and skill content standards. Some examples include:

HBO example: Get help for oneself or others who are in danger of hurting themselves. 
Example of a 6-8 Knowledge Expectations: Explain the importance of telling an adult if there are people who are in danger of hurting themselves of others and describe the signs and symptoms of people who are in danger of hurting themselves or others. 
Example of a 6-8 Skill Expectation: State a health-enhancing position on a violence prevention topic, supported with accurate information, to improve the health of others (Advocacy is the National Health Education Standard).

 

Obesity Prevention: Reduce the proportion of Louisville Metro residents that are overweight and obese. Included in the plan are to implement a system to monitor BMI through the required school physical exam for children entering kindergarten and sixth grade.

My Recommendations: 

1. Use CDCs BMI Measurement in Schools best practices document when collecting BMI information.

2. Increase Walk and Bike to School Initiatives, using best practice programs.

3. Fully implement Alliance for a Healthier Generation's Healthy School Program.

4. Work with Nutrition Services and JCPSs Coordinated School Health Wellness Committee to review expectations of this plan to JCPSs Wellness Policy. Possibly revise if there are opportunities to strengthen the policy.

5. Set strong recess policies and offer recess before lunch

6. Increase the implementation of Human Vitality among staff. Promote school employee wellness programs.

7. Offer, at bare minimum, the national recommendation of minutes for physical education K-12. Hire qualified PE specialists to teach PE, K-12.

5. Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the areas of healthy eating and physical activity. 

 

Oral Health: Improve the oral health of Louisville Metro residents by reducing tooth decay and gum disease. The plan includes to expand school-based dental sealant programs in schools with the greatest need. Improve oral health data collection for youth and children in Louisville Metro. 

My Recommendation: None at this time, but oral health plays a role in attendance of students. It is imperative to have a school-oral health plan. Screening and education.

 

Public Health Infrastructure: Ensure LMPHW has the infrastructure to provide Louisville Metro residents public health services at an optimal level on a daily basis as well as during emergencies. 

My Recommendation: None at this time.

 

Social Determinants of Health: Create social and physical environments that promote good health for all Louisville Metro residents. 

My Recommendation: None at this time.

 

Substance Abuse: Reduce the number of Louisville Metro adults and youth engaging in risky behaviors such as binge drinking and drug abuse. Plan includes a recommendation to adopt and implement a “reality-based approach” as opposed to an emphasis on “abstinence” or “zero-tolerance” as a prevention strategy for teen drug and alcohol use. A reality-based approach provides teens with honest, science-based information; promotes an understanding of the legal and social consequences of drug use, and prioritizes safety through personal responsibility and knowledge.

My Recommendation: 

Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the areas of tobacco and other drugs. HBOs included should be for both knowledge and skill content standards. Some examples include:

HBO example: Avoid experimentation with alcohol and other drugs. 
Example of a 9-12 Knowledge Expectations:  Describe the effects of using alcohol and other drugs on school performance, job performance, job absenteeism, and job loss.
Example of a 9-12 Skill Expectation: Generate alternatives when making a decision related to alcohol and other drug use (Decision-making is the National Health Education Standard).  

Phew! Yup- that was a lot of work. However, this Healthy Louisville 2020 blueprint can be used to advocate for a stronger Coordinated School Health program and K-12 comprehensive health and physical education program locally. Let's embrace it and work together for a healthier community! 

What does a National School Health Consultant do?

A lot of people ask me what a school health consultant does. Instead of abstractly communicating my mission, I'm going to share my current contracts and I think it will paint a clear picture of what we do!

  • I will be the content lead for a conference dedicated to health disparities and childhood obesity funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in partnership with Clinton Foundation's Health Matters Initiative. Being the content lead means I work with all the content for the conference- videos to speakers to the bios that go into the program. I have the opportunity to have calls to brief all the speakers, moderators and strategic partners making commitments. It's a fabulous role that connects me to great people! This event will be in Newark, NJ, May 9.
  • We are working with the Alliance for a Healthier Generation on a project related to their Healthy Schools Program and sustainability. That work will take me to Portland, Indianapolis and a few other TBD locations from now through mid-summer.
  • We are completing a paper for the Colorado Legacy Foundation on school health supporting education accountability measures… how does addressing the health and well-being of students and staff increase test scores/grades, graduation rates and attendance? This work will be completed very soon and available. I will share once the document is public. 
  • Maine Department of Education has hired me to do a keynote presentation at their School-site Wellness Conference late June at Sugarloaf Mountain. Looking forward to addressing a large audience of school teams. More to come on my speaking objectives and content!
  • I will be facilitating the Kentucky Youth Health Network through a strategic planing process late March. This group, formerly called the KY Teen Pregnancy Coalition works on sexual health promotion and risk behavior prevention among youth in Kentucky. We will be reviewing state level sexual health and risk data among youth, developing a vision, bold steps and a 5 year blueprint for action. The hope is that with clear direction, more funding opportunities will be available to do work within the blueprint/strategic plan.
  • I will be facilitating a webinar on Comprehensive School Health Program/Coordinated School Health for SPARK on March 19th at 6pm EST. The objectives for the 75 minute webinar include:
    -Understand the relationship of health issues to education accountability measures
    -Understand the CSH model and how CSPAP fits into the model, and hear examples
    -Learn how to build sustainable school health programs
    -Be encouraged to set one next step goal around what they learned on the webinar
    More information on how to participate soon!
  • I'm co-facilitating a full day pre-conference at the National AAHPERD/SHAPE in St Louis on April 1 for Let's Move Active Schools; Physical Activity Leader Training with Judy LoBianco, 2013 AAHPERD National Physical Education Administrator of the Year 2013
  • Next week I head to Connecticut to facilitate a CDC School Health Guidelines Training for CT Department of Ed (DOE) and CT Department of Health (DOH) and their 1305 grantee school districts. I will be doing a similar training for Tulsa County Public Schools in June. 
  • Jamie Sparks and I will be traveling to Alaska in October to co-facilitate the Systems Thinking Systems Changing simulation for AK DOE and AK DOH for their 1305 grantee school districts. 

Yup- that's what we do! We have some pending work on the horizon. All our work is very different and very exciting. But, all related making schools healthier places for students and staff!

 

Genuineness and Accessibility

Yesterday was what I call, a "home day". Those days, I have the opportunity to focus on local meetings and work. Most of my consulting business keeps me in my office (when not traveling 50% of the time) working in, with and on communities from afar. Yesterday was a Louisville day. Which is exciting considering I just relocated here in November. I started my day with a walk over to tea at a place downtown with a new friend, Sarah, who works in Congressman Yarmouth's office. I met her at a New2Lou event and since then we have tried to regularly connect. We are both passionate about health and have similar stories- strong, active, divorced women. It's great to connect with her on personal and professional issues. From there I walked to Humana and met with the Humana Foundation. I ate lunch in their yummy cafeteria and met with Jeannette. We chatted about some of the work the Foundation is doing and alignment to the work I do. I then walked over to the building where Chrysalis Ventures is, a growth capital company that funds transformative businesses in the industries of healthcare and technology. I was connected to them through a mutual friend and it was a wonderful conversation about my relocation here to Louisville, and the intersections of our work. I then walked back towards my apartment late afternoon and met briefly with Kristi King at the UofL, Jamie Sparks from KY DOE and Ben, ED from the YMCA Youth Association. They were planning a presentation for next week's Southern District AAHPERD in Lexington and I was invited to 'crash' the party for a little and meet both Kristi and Ben. In a small world way, a lot of the people I met with yesterday know each other and David Jones from Chrysalis, Ben from the YMCA and I are all speaking at the upcoming Best of Leadership Louisville Summit March 18.
PHEW! What a fabulous day. Commuted by walking to four meetings, all around local community issues in my new town. All passionate, genuine and accessible people looking to collaborate on things we find important. Life is good when you begin feeling part of a community…! Life is good here. Very good.

2013 Coordinated School Health Summit, All In for Health & Academic Success

Last Thursday, the Department for Public Health (DPH), Cabinet for Health and Family Services sponsored their annual conference and you'll NEVER guess what their topic for this year was?? Coordinated School Health (CSH). It got me thinking… I've moved to the right state.

DPH Coordinated School Health lead, Victoria Greenwell partnered with Department of Education Coordinated School Health, Jamie Sparks, Todd Davis and Stephanie Bunge (which forms the CSH Team between health and education), Board of Education Health Sub-committee and RMC Health (an organization I'm on the Board of Directors for!) to put on this fabulous event. The team worked tirelessly the past couple of months on this event (trust me, I know there have been late evening calls and weekend hours put into this event). What did they pull off? 

Let the day begin! #KYCSH

Let the day begin! #KYCSH

  • Over 350 people in attendance
  • Over 30 school teams attended through leadership of and in partnership with a County Public Health Official
  • All teams completed the WellSAT, a needs assessment tool to assess a school district's Wellness Policy
  • Well-respected education researcher and author, Charles Basch, Healther Students are Better Learners, provided the keynote address
  • Eight, 10 minute CSH Unbridled Talks, "TED-style" presentations by mostly local experts each sharing success stories and advocating for one of the eight components of coordinated school health (soon to be available on YouTube)
  • Walking the talk by offering nutrient-rich, healthy breakfast, snack and lunch options
  • Incorporating youth throughout the day to lead physical activities and introduce representatives from partnering organizations
  • Time for school teams to network and action plan next steps

Some other highlights from the day include:

  • Jefferson County Public Schools' commitment to participate in Let's Move Active Schools, therefore being the largest school district in the country to sign on to this national initiative
  • Welcome from DPH Commissioner Stephanie Mayfield and Chief of Staff at Department of Education, Tommy Floyd, modeling the partnership between health and education
  • Vicki Greenwell interviewing Charles Basch in the afternoon for partners in attendance not associated with a school team
  • Sarah Peterson in attendance from Congressman John Yarmuth's office
  • Also in attendance: Policy Advisor from KY Department of Education- Mary Ann Miller, Division Director of Maternal and Child Health - Dr. Ruth Ann Shepherd and Assistant Director - Marvin Miller, Deputy Secretary for the Cabinet for Health and Family Services- Eric Friedlander, President and Vice-President of KHDA (KY Health Department Association), Anthony Lockard and Paula Alexander
  • Two state representatives joined school teams with their communities including Mary Lou Marzian from Jefferson County and W. Keith Hall from Pike County
  • I sat at the same table with Commissioner Mayfield, Dr. Humbaugh (State Epidemiologist and Sr Deputy Commissioner) and enjoyed lunch conversations with Charles Basch and Tommy Floyd. Kentucky appears to be a place where people genuinely partner and are quite accessible.
  • Key organizations in attendance: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, Humana Vitality, Action for Healthy Kids and many others!
  • Social Media reach on Twitter: 30,000 (see graphs below)

Again, I'm proud and fortunate to live in a state with health and education working together to create healthier school communities! Go US! 

Vicki Greenwell interviewing Charles Basch

Vicki Greenwell interviewing Charles Basch

Tommy Floyd, Department of Education Chief of Staff welcoming participants

Tommy Floyd, Department of Education Chief of Staff welcoming participants

Jamie Sparks, portraying 'Hipster Santa" encouraging participants that there's nothing 'hipper' then posting on social media. Prizes were given throughout the day encouraging those "tweeting"!

Jamie Sparks, portraying 'Hipster Santa" encouraging participants that there's nothing 'hipper' then posting on social media. Prizes were given throughout the day encouraging those "tweeting"!

Twitter statistics for the day!

Twitter statistics for the day!

Let's Move Active Schools!

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This week I'm in Phoenix alongside 20 other invite-only trainers in the field of health and physical education to participate in the first ever national training of trainers (TOT) lead by a partnership between CDC, Nike, Alliance for a Healthier Generation, AAHPERD and the President's Council on Physical Fitness. The TOT is being facilitated by a longtime colleague of mine, Deb Christopher from Bolder Learning and the Physical Activity Leader (content) training is being facilitated by Aaron Beighle from University of Kentucky and Fran Zavacky from AAHPERD, other colleagues of mine that I've known for awhile. 

The training coincides with Arizona's AAHPERD, now called Arizona Health and PE so the regular training today will include another 20 educators from around Arizona. Tomorrow will be the TOT piece, where the original 20 selected trainers will take the next step and become trainers of trainers to help the initiative eventually over 5 years train over 20,000 educators in how to implement the Let's Move Active Schools work.  

The mantra of the initiative is "60 a Day!" and it includes a step by step process for creating sustainable systems change at a school implementing a CSPAP, Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program. A lot of people get recess, physical activity and physical education confused. They may be all different programs within in a school and the goal is that kids are physical active at least 60 minutes a day.

So, how does one implement a CSPAP in a school?  Best practice says, implement a coordinated school health process... 

Step 1: Establish a team. A SHAC, SWC, whatever you call it! Basically a council or team that works together so if that one champion leaves the following year, you have a committee

Step 2: Conduct an assessment of existing physical activity opportunities. Use the Alliance for a Healthier Generation's Inventory! Or the School Health Index! Whatever it is, use something out there that has been developed and tested.

Step 3: Create a vision statement, goals and objectives for your CSPAP and use data from the needs assessment to drive this. 

Step 4: Identify the outcomes or specific changes that will be direct results of the program implementation

Step 5: Identify and plan the activities for your CSPAP

Step 6: Implement! 

Step 7: Evaluate your CSPAP. Make change based on results and improve your programs! 

More to come after Days 2, 3, 4... but here are a few photos from yesterday's training.

 

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Deb, keeping us out of our seats and active!

Deb, keeping us out of our seats and active!