Kentucky Leadership Summit on Childhood Obesity

Afternoon panel at the KY Leadership Summit on Childhood Obesity

Afternoon panel at the KY Leadership Summit on Childhood Obesity

Yesterday, I was invited to an event that began with a wonderful reception at the Maxwell Place, residence of Drs Eli and Mary Lynne Capilouto (President and his wife) on the University of Kentucky's campus. The University of Kentucky (UK) hosted the KY Leadership Summit on Childhood Obesity in partnership with Kentucky Youth Advocates and Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky and with support of a health policy grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The Summit kicked off after the reception with opening remarks from Dr. Steven Wyatt from the School of Public Health at UK and Terry Brooks, Executive Director at Kentucky Youth Advocates. They both did a good job of framing the day… why we were there and what they hope we would accomplish by the end of the day. We were a selected group of organizations and individuals (about 50 people total) in attendance and they hoped we would come to consensus on 3 action items for next steps to address childhood obesity in the Commonwealth. 

We don’t know how to eat, how to create calorie-rich environments.
— David Jones, Jr, Jefferson County Public Schools Board of Education Member, Humana Board of Directors and Chairman of Chrysalis Ventures.

Bill Goodman from Kentucky Education Television interviewed David Jones, representing the Board of Education for Jefferson County Public Schools. David was the Chair of the Humana Board (in which he is still a member) and runs a venture capitalist, Chrysalis Ventures that funds innovative health and technology projects. David suggested that in Kentucky we are fortunate to have a lot of green space, where farmers markets and community gardens may continue to flourish. However, in the urban settings, which he called vertical cities, green space is few and far between. The key to change is using science, knowledge and marketing skills to change the food industry. With Yum! Brands located in Kentucky, we have an opportunity to work with them, not against them, to change the landscape in our communities. They have the skills, brain power and background in the engineering of food in which we can tap into to create healthier communities. David would like to see more education, as he views education to be a direct correlation to health. He also believes we need to change the price of calories, making the nutrient-rich choice the more affordable one. 

Who are you trying to punish? The teacher or the kid?
— Tom Shelton, Superintendent Fayette County School

After the morning interview with David, there were 4, 10 minute TED-style talks given by Dr. Leon Mooneyhan, CEO from Ohio Valley Educational Cooperative, Dr. Heather Erwin, Director of Graduate Studies at UK, Dr. Tom Shelton Superintendent, Fayette County Schools and Jamie Sparks, Director of Coordinated School Health, Kentucky Department of Education. Highlights include Heather discussing the research behind how implementing Comprehensive School Physical Activity Programs (CSPAP) does NOT decrease academic achievement. She went on to discuss the links between health and academic achievement. Tom Shelton talked about how schools sometimes implement silent lunch and take away recess or use physical activity as a punishment. Tom asked, "Who are you trying to punish? The teacher or the kid?" Jamie talked about how in school health we keep trying to find more water to put out the fire versus actually addressing the issues. "We need to get to a point where PE and Health Education is a normal part of the school day. Obesity is a river with lots of contributaries. There are many moving parts." Jamie went on to say that racial, disability and gender inequities were not created within school environments. They were bigger social issues in which schools addressed and became agents of change. Obesity is no different. Schools, as entire communities should address the issue. 

Jess Lawrence, Mary Lynne Capilouto and Jamie Sparks

Jess Lawrence, Mary Lynne Capilouto and Jamie Sparks

In the afternoon, there was an expert panel facilitated by Bill Goodman and included Julie Brackett, VP of Advocacy at the American Heart Association, Dr. Heather Erwin, Director of Graduate Studies at UK, Dr. Stu Silverman, ED at Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence and Dr. Susan Zepeda, CEO Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky. I currently do contract work with the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky and was thrilled to hear Susan discuss how philanthropy/Foundations can help support and address the issue of childhood obesity within schools. She reminded us how the norm should be creating healthy environments and how we all need to model healthy behaviors. We did it with tobacco.

Put a certified PE teacher in every school.
— Wilson Sears, Kentucky Association of School Superintendents

We were then assigned into break out groups to discuss what the ONE next step we would like to see to address childhood obesity within school environments in the Commonwealth. It was wonderful to hear Wilson Sears from the Kentucky Association of School Superintendents say, "Put a certified PE teacher in every school." My break out discussed building awareness, who the right influencers are to build awareness, fitness measures for schools and increase community engagement. Each of the 3 break out groups came to consensus on their top three ideas and from there, all 9 ideas were distilled to three. The three big ideas will be around support and professional development to educators (builds awareness), community and school partnerships and policy. Next steps include workgroups to being strategic planning to implement some of the ideas we discussed in the initial meeting. 

Organizations represented were:
Kentucky Youth Advocates
Kentucky School Board Association
Kentucky Cancer Consortium
YMCA of Greater Louisville
American Heart Association
Kentucky Department of Education
University of Kentucky
Tweens Coalition
Center for Rural Journalism and Community Issues
Former Meade County Superintendent 
KY Assocation for Health, PE, Recreation and Dance
Lexington YMCA
Kentucky Legislature
Kentucky Education Television
Friedell Committee
Kentucky Association of School Councils
Hardin County Schools
JCPS Board of Education
UK, College of Education, School of Public Health, Department of Pediatrics, College of Agriculture
Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky
Kentucky Board of Education
KY Cabinet for Health and Family Services
KY Association of School Superintendents
Fayette County Schools
Prichard Committee
Kentucky PTA
Lincoln County Schools

Susan Zepeda encouraged us all to model healthy activities. Proud to say the day ended with a gorgeous bicycle ride in Mammoth Cave National Park with Jamie Sparks and Stephanie Bunge from the Kentucky Department of Education while traveling from this event in Lexington to Bowling Green for another school health event the following day!

Jess Lawrence, Stephanie Bunge and Jamie Sparks enjoying a bike ride after the event!

Jess Lawrence, Stephanie Bunge and Jamie Sparks enjoying a bike ride after the event!


RMC Health Board of Directors Meeting

Years ago, in 2004, I joined the Society of State Leaders of Health and PE. I was a State Director for Health Education at the Oregon Department of Education. At the time, Sharon Murray was the Executive Director and it was an introduction into my work connections and relationship building nationally. Years later, Sharon would accept the position of the President of RMC Health, a non-profit organization working to strengthen the effectiveness of those working to improve the health and well-being of children and youth. I knew of RMC Health, when they were the primary professional development (PD) organization of all our states funded to do Coordinated School Health work. So, between my membership with Society and RMC Health providing PD support to Oregon, I've known both Sharon and the work of RMC Health for about ten years. 

A year ago, Sharon approached me about being on the Board of Directors and after giving it some thought (mostly determining my capacity), I decided to commit to being on the RMC Board because:

  • I believe in their mission and vision;
  • It is a great opportunity to continue to build partnerships and relationships;
  • I am passionate about making schools healthier places and paid work isn’t the only way to do it;
  • Growing an organization, with intention, is exciting work;
  • I want to learn and grow professionally and this opportunity offers that.

You can ready more on why I joined the Board in this blog post dated November 20, 2013 here

We have Board meetings every other month via video conference, however, once a year we come to Colorado and meet in person. Today was our annual in-person meeting at the Pepsi Center. It was a great opportunity for me to meet the rest of the Board in person and engage with RMC Health's Leadership Team. And, the entire staff joined us for some networking at the end of the day.

RMC Health Board of Directors and Leadership Team

RMC Health Board of Directors and Leadership Team

I truly believe that RMC Health provides state of the art PD for educators in the field. Our vision is healthy children and youth and the work leads us there! I am honored to be a part of an organization moving the needle on kids health. The leadership and staff at RMC Health are extraordinary and I feel incredibly valued and appreciated being part of this great team!

Connecticut School Health Guidelines Training

School district teams working on their 5 year vision.

School district teams working on their 5 year vision.

Yesterday I had the opportunity to work with 4 school districts in Connecticut that will be working with the CT Department of Public Health and CT Department of Education on physical activity and nutrition programs under the CDC's State Public Health Actions to Prevent and Control Diabetes, Heart Disease, Obesity and Associated Risk Factors and Promote School Health also known as the 1305 or Quad grant.

It was a great opportunity for these districts to learn more about tools and resources that will help them assess where their school is at around programs, policies and practices related to physical activity, physical education and healthy eating. I lead them through many activities including:

  • A 'think out of the box"/ creative visioning activity- what media/people will be saying about them in 5 years from now as a result of this work;
  • practicing your stairwell speech for making the case to create healthier learning environments for both students and staff;
  • filling in a crosswalk tool that allows participants to align federal and state mandates/education accountability measures and initiatives to health goals; and
  • participating in a jigsaw activity to become familiar with the nine guidelines within the School Health Guidelines tool.
Norwich CT team's Visioning Activity!

Norwich CT team's Visioning Activity!

Evaluations were super strong and I had a great time seeing my parents and being back in my home state, during the BEST week ever... GO UCONN! Meeting these school teams was fantastic and I hope I have the opportunity to work with them again over the next 4-5 years!

 

I couldn't resist. CDC does NOT endorse UCONN Huskies. :)

I couldn't resist. CDC does NOT endorse UCONN Huskies. :)

Let's Move Active Schools Physical Activity Leader Training

Welcoming the participants for the day.

Welcoming the participants for the day.

Yesterday, LMAS held it's first-ever LMAS PAL training at a national conference. Judy LoBianco and I facilitated the full-day event and had the opportunity to work with 40 fabulous new PALs from around the country and even the world! 

The goal of the training is to bring participants through a process in which they gain knowledge and skills to go home and implement a Comprehensive School Physical Activity Program. It's actually not a program, but a philosophy or way of incorporating a minimum of 60 minutes of physical activity throughout a school day. The core of this work is quality physical education programs, taught by a certified physical education teacher who receives on-going professional development (ideal!). But, reality is that most students do not get 60 minutes of physical education a day. So, how do we incorporate physical activity throughout the day? Before and after-school programs, like walk and bike to school, open gym opportunities. We can promote physical activity during recess including incentives for walking or running laps for students. We can incorporate physical activity within the classroom- any classroom, any subject. For example, yesterday I encouraged participants to get up and make shapes and obtuse and acute angles with their bodies. Why not incorporate math and movement? With all those opportunities to include physical activity throughout the day, it should be no problem for every school in America to provide 60 minutes of physical activity (PA) throughout the day for their students. 

Judy LoBianco role modeling "Making the Case" pitch to "principal" Jamie Sparks.

Judy LoBianco role modeling "Making the Case" pitch to "principal" Jamie Sparks.

So, why do it? Well, obviously the obesity epidemic is on everyone's mind. But, there are a lot more benefits to implementing PA programs. Walking and biking to school means less vehicles on school grounds, which may mean less accidents and can result in better air quality that decreases asthma triggers and increases attendance (asthma is the leading cause of absenteeism related to chronic disease in many state). Walking and biking is also better for the environment and creates safer communities when youth are out and about. That is one example and realizing not every school is walk and bike accessible, there are 100s of other ways to incorporate PA throughout the day. The research on what PA does for the brain is there. It jumpstarts it again! It may lead to higher test scores and academic achievement. PA leads to increased motivation, alertness and attention. 

Jump on board! Learn about how you can get in involved in increasing PA for your students (and, I'd include staff in that as well!) by going here!

Kentucky Youth Health Network

Formerly the KY Teen Pregnancy Coalition, the KY Youth Health Network has decided to expand their scope of work to all areas of preventative youth health behaviors. This organization, currently a 501c3, is going through a planning process to develop a new mission, purpose and strategic plan. This past Monday, I was fortunate enough to facilitate a strategic planning session with this passionate Board including representation from the Kentucky Department of Education, Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services, Clark County Health Department (HD), Jessamine County HD, American Civil Liberties Union of Kentucky, Kentuckiana Works, Lexington/Fayette County HD and KY River District HD - Lee County. 

By the end of the day, we came up with action steps that will not only be short-term next steps, but long-term actions that will be part of a new strategic plan. We engaged in a fun activity to practice our elevator pitch which led to the development of a word cloud and we were presented with Kentucky's most recent Youth Risk Behavior Survey Data results by Stephanie Bunge at the KY DOE. Stay tuned as this group transitions to a broader perspective on youth health and works to bring on more partners and collaborate with more organizations to create a healthier Kentucky for our adolescents! 

"It's Just One Cupcake… What's the Big Deal?"

Surprisingly, the most difficult, heated, complicated, divisive discussions in school health right now do not have to do with sex education, but celebrations and competitive foods (vending/fundraisers). I recently saw a friend post on Facebook that she brought cupcakes to her son's pre-school birthday party. I texted her that she was killing me! Her response? It's the last year he gets them. Well, I didn't respond, but I don't think she got it. I'm not against cupcakes or sugar. But, here's the point...

Jill Turley, the Competitive Food Content Advisor for the Alliance for a Healthier Generation recently presented at the Smart Snacks Summit in Elizabethtown, Kentucky. She asked, "Have you heard, It's just one cupcake… what's the big deal?" I chuckled thinking it was only days prior I heard the same argument. Jill showed a recent photo of a elementary school student's plate after a Valentine's Day celebration. Almost 600 calories. Never mind how many students visited the nurses office as a result of a headache after. Or, the behavior in the classroom post-celebration. Jill mentioned that in a class of 20 students, if every kid had cupcakes for their birthday, that amounts to over 10,000 extra calories a year for these students. For an adult, that's an extra 10lbs a year.

And again, what about the time off-task as a result of the sugar… isn't school about creating consistently healthy messages? Our youth are getting plenty of sugar outside of schools. Let's keep schools a place where what they learn in nutrition education is consistent with healthy messages, policies and practices. Rewarding students with food leads to encouraging them to eat when they are not necessarily hungry, and these become learned behaviors in adulthood that we know are contributing to overeating and adult obesity issues. 

So, what are some ideas for birthday celebrations? Most of these come from Jill's presentation (thanks Jill!):

  • Dance party with a special playlist
  • Extra playtime
  • Show and tell
  • Scavenger hunt

If you still want to have food:

  • Spa water (kids pick their own veggies and fruits to add (cucumbers, mint, strawberries, oranges, bananas, etc)
  • Fruit smoothies
  • Fruits and veggies
  • Yogurt parfaits
  • Trail Mix bar (they get a bag and create their own with different options. If you can't use nuts, use seeds!
  • Roll ups- have cookie cutters to make shapes

If you weren't able to attend the The Alliance for a Healthier Generation's Smart Snack Summits last week which provided professional development, resources and information on the new federal regulations on smart snacks in school that go into affect July 1, you can go here to find out more. 

I was invited by Jacy Wooley, western Kentucky Program Manager for the Alliance for a Healthier Generation. The training participants included district food service directors, health and PE teachers, school board members, Department of Education representative, administrators and other school health advocates. Thanks for the invite Jacy... fabulous, informative workshop!

Resources to Support School Health

Yesterday I posted a list of resources specific to the field of K-12 school health education. Today, I'm going to share a list of resources within the larger field of school health that I refer to regularly. I know there are many more out there. I'll attempt to categorize for ease of finding information! If you have others to share, email me and I'll add them to this post!

 

Partnerships

Partnering for Success: How Health Departments Work and How to Work with Health Departments- This is a great resource especially useful for schools to understand how to partner with their local health departments to work together to create a culture of health within the school environment.

How Schools Work & How to Work with Schools- Great tool for individuals or organizations that want to work with schools, but scratch their head because they function so differently! This tool is worth the $5!

 

Research to Support School Health

Healthier Students are Better Learners- A fabulous 'essay' written by Charles E. Basch used widely that addresses how health-related problems among youth are affecting our students' ability to achieve. Make the case to your administrator or leadership using this document!

 

Research Review:
School-based Health Interventions and Academic Achievement 
- Fabulous report by Julia Dilley. From document, "Research Review: School-based Health Interventions and Academic Achievement provides important new evidence that links students’ health and academic performance. It identifies proven health interventions and practical resources that can positively affect both student health and academic achievement."

 

Implementing a Coordinated School Health Program (CSHP)

Tools That Work! - This is a toolkit developed by the MIssissippi Department of Education and provides a CSH guide to building a healthy school.

 

Aligning Health and Education Accountability Measures

I have an article from CCSSO called Incorporating Health into Education Accountability Systems, however I can't find it online. Contact me if you want more information!

 

Safe Routes to School

School Nurses as Safe Routes to School Champions Improving the Built Environment and Increasing Physical Activity 

Safe Routes to School State Network Project: Final Report, 2007–2009; Making Change Through Partners and Policies 

 

Sexual Health

Oregon Youth Sexual Health Plan- this document is a part of a larger state-wide approach to increasing the sexual health of adolescents in Oregon. However, objective #5 is on Providing Education and skill building for youth and families and includes comprehensive sex education language and goals.  

 

Return on Investment

Investment in School Health Capacity; Payoffs in Health, Achievement and Stronger Communities - Fantastic document (yes, I helped review!) put together by Oregon Health Authority, the Public Health Division and good colleagues/friends of mine that not only defines core capacity as "(1) having a school health coordinator; (2) conducting a health focused self-assessment1; (3) having a health-related School Improvement Plan goal and objective; and (4) having a school health advisory group that includes an administrator and a community member. Together these components represent the staffing, data, leadership, accountability, and broad support that is needed to effectively support health and achievement in school settings" but discusses the dollar return on investment when schools or districts implement school health programs. A must-read document. I hope it drives further studies and is used as a tool to advocate for the fiscal reason we should be working on school health. 

 

Policy

State School Health Policy Matrix- From the website: "The National Association of Chronic Disease Directors (NACDD), along with the National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE) and American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD) have worked together to develop this guide to state-level school health policies for the following topics: competitive foods and beverages, physical education and physical activity, and administration of medication in the school environment. The State School Health Policy Matrix outlines relevant state-level policies for each of these areas, including a direct link to the policy. It also it indicates which political entity or agency adopted the policy or issued guidance, helping to an­swer the question – Who has historically had the authority to make policy changes in the areas of competitive foods and beverages, physical education and physical activity, and administration of medication in each state?"

 

Administrative Support

What School Administrators Can Do to Enhance Student Learning by Supporting a Coordinated Approach to Health 

 

School Health Advisory Councils (SHACs)

Promoting Healthy Youth, Schools, and Communities- A Guide to Community-School Health CouncilsI still refer to this guide that helps support a school or district in developing what we know, is one of the most important aspects of creating a sustainable school health program. 

Gearing Up for School Health- Webinar!

I'm facilitating a webinar hosted by SPARK on Wednesday, March 19 at 3pm PST/6pm EST! More information on how to register to come, but see description below. Feel free to share with others.

“Riding the Path to a Comprehensive School Health Program”

You can’t ride a bicycle unless all the parts are working. In addition, the parts need to work cohesively for a smooth ride to your destination.  A successful comprehensive school health program (CSHP) must have multiple components working together for one common goal…. building healthier schools. Join us at the next SPARK webinar to learn about best practices and successful strategies for building your program, as well as develop action steps to support activities to make it happen. Students must be healthy in order to be educated, and they must be educated in order to stay healthy. Implementing a comprehensive school health program does not need to always be an uphill climb. Lead your school down the path by guiding the implementation of programs, policies, and activities to improve the health of children. Our guest speaker, Jessica Lawrence of Cairn Guidance will share her lessons learned and experiences in building a CSHP. Register now to start the journey towards a healthy school environment!

Attendees will:

  • Be presented with the relationship of health issues to education accountability measures (test scores, graduation rates, attendance);
  • Understand the CSHP model and how CSPAP fits into the model, and hear examples;
  • Be presented with information on best practices when building sustainable school health programs;
  • Be encouraged to set one next step goal around what you learned on the webinar.

Reading, reading and more reading

As a child, I struggled as a reader. My mom loved to read and I remember her taking my brother and I on weekly visits to the library. We would come back with a stack of books. My books would sit collecting dust most of the week, untouched until heading back the following week to return the books and check out new ones. My brother's pile, however, were all over the house. He read these books in his bed, on the orange shag carpet in the den, in the car, on the toilet (I guess?!?). I was more of a interpersonal communicator than individual reader. I talked. I acted, I danced. I read when I needed to, but it didn't come easily to me and it wasn't how I wanted to spend my time. I would rather climb the tree in the front yard or swing on the swings with my neighborhood friends.

Fast forward thirty years later and reading isn't something I choose to do in my spare time, although I'm not swinging on swings often either! However, I do read. I enjoy it. Do I love it? No. I'm currently working on a few projects that require I read. Read a lot. And, it's research. But, I'm enjoying it. I enjoy it because I love the work I'm doing. I'm trying to read as much as I can about sustainability. What makes a school program or project sustain? Even after the onsite assistance, or dollars, or resources go away? And, as I read, I come up with what I think are brilliant ideas (of course!). We should require a school health support question for every district superintendent we hire. We should make sure that at institutions of higher education include a course on school health in order to gain a school administrator license. Let's make sure schools aren't just implementing 'cool' programs, but those programs are effective and needed based on data driven decisions/prioritizing. 

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So, I read as I know I need to. And with practice, it really isn't so bad. I know I'd rather be bicycling or facilitating, or talking or writing even. But, it's something I just have to do. With that, it's time to dive back into the stack of articles sitting here by my desk!

Healthy Louisville 2020; Creating a Healthier City

Kudos to my new city for the public health plan released last week! The roadmap serves as a call to action to guide Louisville towards a healthier city. The mission of the Louisville Metro Department of Public Health and Wellness (LMPHW) is to promote health and wellness; prevent disease, illness, and injury; and protect the health and safety of Metro Louisville residents and visitors. The focus is prevention, evidence-based intervention and health in all policies. There are 13 goals within this roadmap. It's incredibly comprehensive. 

Of course being a school health consultant, who works nationally to create healthier schools, and living in Louisville, I need to make some suggestions as to how schools may be able to support this public health plan. I see that Donna Hargens, the Superintendent of Jefferson County Public Schools is on the Mayor's Healthy Hometown Movement Leadership Team. I love this! I'd like to suggest some recommendations from a K-12 school perspective that align to the 13 goals within the plan. I see a few mentions in the document regarding schools, but that doesn't mean we can't build off the recommendations and add more to support the plan at the K-12 level. Here we go...

Access to Healthcare: All Louisville Metro residents will have health insurance coverage and receive care in a patient-centered medial home. 

My Recommendations:

1. Utilize access to parents/guardians in schools to bring awareness and education of changes in eligibility criteria for Medicaid and ensure all Metro residents eligible for Medicaid are enrolled as part of the expansion under ACA. 

2. Promote and open School-Based Health Centers

 

Cancer Prevention and Screening: Decrease the incidence and death rates for all cancers in Louisville Metro. Goals include: decreasing lung, breast, cervical, prostate, colorectal cancers. Recommendations do include increasing awareness of HPV vaccine for both males and females through outreach to schools.

My Recommendation: Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the areas of healthy eating, physical activity, sexual health and tobacco. HBOs included should be for both knowledge and skill content standards.

 

Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening: Prevent, detect, and reduce risk factors that cause diabetes, coronary heart disease, and stroke among Louisville Metro residents. 

My Recommendations:
1. Work with Nutrition Services and JCPSs Coordinated School Health Wellness Committee to review expectations of this plan to JCPSs Wellness Policy. Possibly revise if there are opportunities to strengthen the policy.

2. Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the areas of healthy eating, physical activity, and tobacco. HBOs included should be for both knowledge and skill content standards. Some examples include:

HBO: Eat an abundance of fruits and vegetables every day.
Example of a K-2 Knowledge Expectation:
Explain the importance of choosing healthy foods and beverages. 
Example of a K-2 Skill Expectation:  Demonstrate effective refusal skills to avoid unhealthy food choices and promote healthy eating (Interpersonal Communication is the National Health Education Standard).

HBO: Regularly engage in physical activities that enhance cardio-respiratory endurance, flexibility, muscle endurance, and muscle strength. 
Example of a 9-12 Knowledge Expectation:
Evaluate the short-term and long-tern benefits of physical activity, including improving cardiovascular health, strength, endurance, and flexibility; healthy weight management; and reducing chronic diseases.
Example of a 9-12 Skill Expectation: Formulate an effective long-term personal health plan to achieve a personal goal to be physically active (Goal-Setting is the National Health Education Standard)

 

Healthy Neighborhoods and Healthy Homes: Reduce the prevalence of and death rate related to tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke in Louisville Metro. 

My Recommendation: Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the area of  tobacco. HBOs included should be for both knowledge and skill content standards. Some examples include:

HBO example: Avoid second-hand smoke and support a tobacco-free environment. 
Example of a 6-8 Knowledge Expectation: Summarize the effects of secondhand smoke. 
Example of a 6-8 Skill Expectation: Persuade others to be tobacco-free and avoid exposure to second-hand smoke (Advocacy is the National Health Education Standard).

 

Healthy Mothers and Healthy Babies: Improve the health and well-being of mothers and babies in Louisville Metro. One recommendation includes implementing evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs in Louisville. 

My Recommendation: Write and implement a K-12 sexual health policy that includes comprehensive, age appropriate sex education. See model policies through NASBE. Use HECAT to develop a sexual health promotion strand within JCPSs scope and sequence.

 

HIV Prevention and Screening: Reduce human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among Louisville Metro residents.

My Recommendation: Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the area of sexual health. HBOs included should be for both knowledge and skill content standards. Some examples include:

HBO example: Engage in behaviors that prevent or reduce sexually transmitted disease (STD), including HIV infection. 
Example of a 9-12 Knowledge Expectations: Justify why abstinence from sex and drugs are the safest, most effective risk avoidance methods of protection from HIV, other STDs, and pregnancy and summarize ways to prevent pregnancy and the sexual transmission of HIV and other common STDs. 
Example of a 9-12 Skill Expectation: Determine when professional sexual healthcare services may be required (Accessing Valid Information is the National Health Education Standard). 

 

Injury and Violence Prevention: Decrease the prevalence of violence and unintentional injuries in Louisville Metro. The plan includes identifying opportunities to increase educational attainment, close the achievement gap, and reduce the disproportionate number of school suspensions and alternative school placements by race. 

My Recommendation: Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the areas of violence and safety. HBOs included should be for both knowledge and skill content standards. Some examples include:

HBO Violence example: Manage interpersonal conflict in nonviolent ways. 
HBO Safey example: Support others to avoid risky behaviors and be safe. 
Example of a 3-5 Knowledge Expectation: Explain the role of bystanders in escalating, preventing or stopping bullying, fighting and violence. 
Example of a 3-5 Skill Expectation: Analyze how relevant influences of media and technology affect personal violence practices and behaviors (Analyzing Influences is the National Health Education Standard).

 

Mental and Behavioral Health: Improve the mental and emotional well-being of Louisville Metro residents. Plan includes a recommendation around improving mental and behavioral health data collection, including suicide attempts in grades K-12.

My Recommendations: 

1. Work with Kentucky Department of Education to implement CDCs Youth Risk Behavior Survey in all schools.

2. Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the areas of mental and emotional health and violence (where suicide is addressed in the HECAT). HBOs included should be for both knowledge and skill content standards. Some examples include:

HBO example: Get help for oneself or others who are in danger of hurting themselves. 
Example of a 6-8 Knowledge Expectations: Explain the importance of telling an adult if there are people who are in danger of hurting themselves of others and describe the signs and symptoms of people who are in danger of hurting themselves or others. 
Example of a 6-8 Skill Expectation: State a health-enhancing position on a violence prevention topic, supported with accurate information, to improve the health of others (Advocacy is the National Health Education Standard).

 

Obesity Prevention: Reduce the proportion of Louisville Metro residents that are overweight and obese. Included in the plan are to implement a system to monitor BMI through the required school physical exam for children entering kindergarten and sixth grade.

My Recommendations: 

1. Use CDCs BMI Measurement in Schools best practices document when collecting BMI information.

2. Increase Walk and Bike to School Initiatives, using best practice programs.

3. Fully implement Alliance for a Healthier Generation's Healthy School Program.

4. Work with Nutrition Services and JCPSs Coordinated School Health Wellness Committee to review expectations of this plan to JCPSs Wellness Policy. Possibly revise if there are opportunities to strengthen the policy.

5. Set strong recess policies and offer recess before lunch

6. Increase the implementation of Human Vitality among staff. Promote school employee wellness programs.

7. Offer, at bare minimum, the national recommendation of minutes for physical education K-12. Hire qualified PE specialists to teach PE, K-12.

5. Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the areas of healthy eating and physical activity. 

 

Oral Health: Improve the oral health of Louisville Metro residents by reducing tooth decay and gum disease. The plan includes to expand school-based dental sealant programs in schools with the greatest need. Improve oral health data collection for youth and children in Louisville Metro. 

My Recommendation: None at this time, but oral health plays a role in attendance of students. It is imperative to have a school-oral health plan. Screening and education.

 

Public Health Infrastructure: Ensure LMPHW has the infrastructure to provide Louisville Metro residents public health services at an optimal level on a daily basis as well as during emergencies. 

My Recommendation: None at this time.

 

Social Determinants of Health: Create social and physical environments that promote good health for all Louisville Metro residents. 

My Recommendation: None at this time.

 

Substance Abuse: Reduce the number of Louisville Metro adults and youth engaging in risky behaviors such as binge drinking and drug abuse. Plan includes a recommendation to adopt and implement a “reality-based approach” as opposed to an emphasis on “abstinence” or “zero-tolerance” as a prevention strategy for teen drug and alcohol use. A reality-based approach provides teens with honest, science-based information; promotes an understanding of the legal and social consequences of drug use, and prioritizes safety through personal responsibility and knowledge.

My Recommendation: 

Within a K-12 comprehensive health education program and within JCPSs health education scope and sequence that includes age appropriate Healthy Behavioral Outcomes from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Health Education Curriculum Analysis in the areas of tobacco and other drugs. HBOs included should be for both knowledge and skill content standards. Some examples include:

HBO example: Avoid experimentation with alcohol and other drugs. 
Example of a 9-12 Knowledge Expectations:  Describe the effects of using alcohol and other drugs on school performance, job performance, job absenteeism, and job loss.
Example of a 9-12 Skill Expectation: Generate alternatives when making a decision related to alcohol and other drug use (Decision-making is the National Health Education Standard).  

Phew! Yup- that was a lot of work. However, this Healthy Louisville 2020 blueprint can be used to advocate for a stronger Coordinated School Health program and K-12 comprehensive health and physical education program locally. Let's embrace it and work together for a healthier community!